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Christ the Refugee ©

The words are so simple and common. They come at the conclusion of Matthew’s great story of the Savior’s birth. We read the story at Christmas but rarely focus on closing verses and still less preach on them. “When the magi had departed, an angel from the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, ‘Get up. Take the child and his mother and escape to Egypt. Stay there until I tell you, for Herod will soon search for the child in order to kill him.’  Joseph got up and, during the night, took the child and his mother to Egypt” (Matthew 2:13-14). Jesus was a political refugee fleeing political persecution. Today we are confronting a similar refugee crisis streaming out Syria. In May, while in Europe for a Council of Bishops meeting, the European refugee crisis dominated the news. Today we are just beginning to confront the breadth of this horrible crisis and the way it is impacting not just Europe but the wider world. The level of human suffering is massive. The numbers are staggering. The need is enormous. I have read a variety of articles about who is to blame. Clearly the primary guilt resides with the oppression of the Assad regime and the true evil of ISIS. The casual reader can consume articles about the failure of various European countries and the way they are handling the crisis on their door step. Some articles go wider afield and note the failure of wealthy Arab regimes in the area to help. Some point to the actions of U.S. and Coalition governments in pulling forces out of an unstable country in neighboring Iraq (inadvertently and unintentionally aiding the establishment of ISIS). Still others point to the slow response of the U.N. relief agency. As a Christian, a Christ follower, I challenge us to avoid getting caught in the blame game. Instead focus on a basic biblical truth. Christ was a refugee from the brutal oppression of Herod. Our Lord and Master can be found among the Syrian refugees. As Christ followers we are to reach out with help in compassion and love. It really is that simple. One of the truly great worldwide ministries of the United Methodist Church is UMCOR (The United Methodist Committee on Relief). There is a detailed separate article on the Central Texas Conference website about the refugee crisis and our response. I urge you to read the full article. It notes in part: “For more than a year, the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) has been responding to the conflict in the Middle East by assisting refugees and displaced persons in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Turkey. Working with local and international partners and via grants totaling nearly $2 million, UMCOR has helped alleviate suffering in the region by providing food, water, clothing, household items and improved places for children to learn and play. UMCOR’s efforts are continuing in this arena, including additional projects expected to be approved during the last quarter of 2015.” As we reflect on Christ the refugee, I am asking the members and churches of the Central Texas Conference to take two very specific actions. First, please be in committed dedicated prayer for the refugees. Lift them up in worship services at your church. Make prayer for refugees a part of your daily prayer life. Second, I urge you to respond through your local church in tangible financial gifts through the great UMCOR ministry. To support UMCOR’s ongoing efforts in response to this and other disasters as well as its work to reduce disaster risk, I ask that an offering be taken for the International Disaster Response Advance, #982450 Just prior to attending the 2008 Jurisdictional Conference where I was elected a bishop in the United Methodist Church, Jolynn and I went on a spiritual formation retreat through the Pastors Retreat Network. In my directed spiritual reading, I came across a piece of writing by a Russian Orthodox Metropolitan Bishop. My vague memory is that the Metropolitan Bishop was writing in 1880s. I cannot remember his name but the words have stuck with me: “Whenever someone new enters a room, Christ enters the room. And, oh, he [Christ] comes in such disguises.” Join me in seeing Christ in the refugee. However well disguised, the Lord is present.