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Episcopal Response to Supreme Court Decision on Same Sex Marriages ©

Dear Friends in Christ, I write you in response to today’s ruling by the United States Supreme Court that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States.  I offer first spiritual guidance consistent with the best shared understanding of the Christian faith.  Wherever you may be on a spectrum from overjoyed reaction to the ruling to deep despair over the Court’s decision, catch a breath.  God is in charge of the universe, and we are not.   This is a good thing.  Christ still reigns and the Holy Spirit is still active in our lives.  The advice of the Apostle Paul in Philippians 4 applies to us all regardless of our convictions on the contentious issue of same-sex marriage. “Let your gentleness show in your treatment of all people. The Lord is near. Don’t be anxious about anything; rather, bring up all of your requests to God in your prayers and petitions, along with giving thanks. Then the peace of God that exceeds all understanding will keep your hearts and minds safe in Christ Jesus.”  (Philippians 4:5-7) While fully respecting the Supreme Court ruling, the United Methodist Church’s position on same-sex marriages has not changed.  My understanding and that of our Conference Chancellor is that the Supreme Court’s decision is directed at state laws that bar same-gender persons from marriage and not at religious doctrine or church law, therefore the decision does not change section 341.6 of the Discipline or any other church law.”  [“Ceremonies that celebrate homosexual unions shall not be conducted by our ministers and shall not be conducted in our churches.” (¶ 341.6 The Book of Discipline, 2012, p. 270)]  It is important to note that the decision contains the following statements concerning the rights of religious persons and organizations: “Many who deem same-sex marriage to be wrong reach that conclusion based on decent and honorable religious or philosophical premises, and neither they nor their beliefs are disparaged here.” Paragraph 161F of The Book of Discipline, 2012 states: “We affirm that all persons are individuals of sacred worth, created in the image of God. All persons need the ministry of the Church in their struggles for human fulfillment, as well as the spiritual and emotional care of a fellowship that enables reconciling relationships with God, with others, and with self. The United Methodist Church does not condone the practice of homosexuality and considers this practice incompatible with Christian teaching. We affirm that God’s grace is available to all. We will seek to live together in Christian community, welcoming, forgiving, and loving one another, as Christ has loved and accepted us.  We implore families and churches not to reject or condemn lesbian and gay members and friends. We commit ourselves to be in ministry for and with all persons” (p. 111). The Discipline goes on to state: We affirm the sanctity of the marriage covenant that is expressed in love, mutual support, personal commitment, and shared fidelity between a man and a woman. We believe that God’s blessing rests upon such marriage, whether or not there are children of the union. We reject social norms that assume different standards for women than for men in marriage. We support laws in civil society that define marriage as the union of one man and one woman” (¶ 161b The Book of Discipline, 2012, p. 109). Nothing about our current doctrine or discipline has been changed. United Methodist clergy are not permitted to perform same-gender marriages and such ceremonies may not be held in our churches. Performance of a same-sex wedding ceremony is a violation of current church law (¶ 2702.1(b) The Book of Discipline, 2012, p. 776).  Only General Conference has the right to change church law. I have been asked by some clergy about the limits regarding what they can and cannot do. I offer the following guidelines in line with other bishops of the United Methodist Church.  Along with many of my colleagues on the Council of Bishops and for the sake of transparency, members of the Central Texas Conference should be aware of what may and may not be done without committing a chargeable offense.
  • Clergy may not allow any United Methodist church building to be used for same-gender marriages.
    • They can help the persons find another venue—another church, home, etc.
    • They can suggest they hold the service outside the church and off church property.
  • Clergy can participate in these ways:
    • Pre-marital counseling
    • Attend the ceremony
    • Read scripture, pray, or give the meditation
    • Lift up a same-gender, newly married couple in worship or by printed announcements. [Please note: If clergy choose to do this, I strongly urge that they be in prior conversation with the lay leadership of their church, especially members of the Staff/Pastor-Parish Relations Committee.]
  • Clergy cannot participate in these ways:
    • Preside over the ceremony, specifically the vows, exchange of rings or the declaration and pronouncement of marriage.
    • Sign the certificate of marriage.
    • Clergy should not participate or stand during any ceremony where it might appear to those present or in photographs that you are presiding or conducting the ceremony. Clergy may engage in limited participation in the ways described above.
I cannot emphasize strongly enough that we be a people of love and care for all in the name of Christ under the guidance of the Holy Spirit!  All really does mean all - for those who we agree with strongly and for those with whom we disagree passionately! The United Methodist Church has been debating the practice of homosexuality for well over 40 years. This most recent Supreme Court decision will not end the debate.  Good, godly people hold passionately different convictions on this issue.  Let us first and foremost live as a people of the Savior’s grace and compassion to all involved.  The great hymn of love sung by the earliest Christians needs to be lived out in our lives by each us of.  “Love is patient, love is kind, it isn’t jealous, it doesn’t brag, it isn’t arrogant, it isn’t rude, it doesn’t seek its own advantage, it isn’t irritable, it doesn’t keep a record of complaints, it isn’t happy with injustice, but it is happy with the truth. Love puts up with all things, trusts in all things, hopes for all things, endures all things” (I Corinthians 13:4-7). Yours in Christ, Bishop Mike Lowry Resident Bishop of the Central Texas Conference The Fort Worth Episcopal Area of The United Methodist Church